Nympho girl

Added: Charley Schell - Date: 29.11.2021 07:24 - Views: 16789 - Clicks: 5197

Read the Review. InMiss T. According to the physicians who described the case in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journalher conversation and actions left no doubt that she suffered from the nympho girl she uttered the "most disgusting obscenities" and moved nympho girl body in ways that expressed her uncontrolled "libidinous feelings. After a vaginal examination, they determined that her uterus was enlarged, her vagina over-abundantly moist, but her long and "tumid" clitoris was the telltale of nymphomania.

They applied various caustics to her genitals to cool her ardor and tried other traditional remedies, such as bleeding and cold-water douches. After several weeks, the doctors pronounced her greatly improved, with "not a symptom remaining referable to nymphomania. At the time, the doctors' treatment of Miss T. Physicians did not understand much about the causes of disease and still relied on traditional remedies based on ancient Greek notions: disease meant that the body's system was out of balance. Consequently, bloodletting or purging restored the necessary equilibrium in the body.

Blistering and caustics created a counterirritant, which drew poisons to the surface, and stimulated the body to return to its natural balance. Cooling baths, moderate diet, and sedatives calmed overstimulated nerves.

Nympho girl

This belief system was widely shared by both lay people and physicians. Doctors and patients alike looked to nympho girl of strong emetics or bleeding as tangible evidence that the physician was resolutely treating the disease. In diagnosing Miss T. Men, too, would have been bled, purged, and blistered for a variety of conditions; but physicians were less likely to connect men's ailments to their genitalia, while assuming that women's reproductive organs caused both physical and mental disease.

At a time when many women were overworked and undernourished, and further burdened by numerous pregnancies, it is not surprising that they experienced a variety of physical maladies. Consequently, debilitating conditions related to the ovaries and uterus were not that unusual.

Nympho girl

But ideological beliefs played a crucial role as well. It was widely accepted that women's reproductive capacity—from puberty to menopause—dominated their entire being. Wombs and by the middle of the nineteenth century, ovaries shaped and determined women's nature far more than testes affected men's lives. As a result, not only doctors but average citizens as well nympho girl that gynecological problems lay at the root nympho girl many female diseases, including nervous and mental conditions.

Since all parts of the body were thought to be interrelated, an upset stomach or an inflamed organ could lead to a disordered mind, and vice versa. In particular, a theory of "reflex action" posited that a disease in the genitals caused a sympathetic response in other organs of the body, particularly the brain. Reflex action nympho girl affected men as well, but women's more delicate nerves and monthly "crises" increased their vulnerability to potential maladies. Much more frequently than men, women faced the potential danger of reestablishing an internal equilibrium following the monthly loss of menstrual blood.

These theories shaped medical notions of ill-defined diseases such as nymphomania. In the case of Miss T. There doctors observed firsthand the most extreme forms of the female behavior which they diagnosed as nymphomania: indecent attacks on asylum attendants, lewd and obscene language, violent tearing off of clothes, and incessant, public masturbation. The women described in these s may have been psychotic or suffering from brain disease. On the other hand, they may have been rebelling against the institution's strictures, while asylum doctors and attendants understood their unladylike behavior to be a symptom of a sexual disease.

In any case, medical men who wrote about nymphomania made a connection between inappropriate behavior observed among patients in mental hospitals and women who came to them to express concern about their sexual desires. As a result, physicians saw the potential for nymphomania in a wide range of behavior.

Nymphomania was diagnosed in behavior as diverse as lascivious glances, on the one hand, and sexually attacking a man, on the other. In the Victorian period, both doctors and the patients who sought medical help believed that strong sexual desire in a woman was a symptom of disease.

Self-control and moderation were central to the health of both men and women, but women's presumably milder sexual appetite meant that any s of excess might al that she was dangerously close to the edge of sexual madness.

Nympho girl

Not surprisingly, physicians registered the greatest concern when the disease appeared in "refined and virtuous" women. Many different medical theories attempted to for the causes of nymphomania: overwrought nerves, brain inflammation, spinal lesions, misshapen he, as well as irritated genitals and enlarged clitorises. But the physicians' concern was also a moral one.

Nympho girl

They understood nymphomania to be about sexual indulgence and excess, about sexual desire uncontrolled by the will, about succumbing to temptation. While attempting to define excessive sexual desire as a disease, physicians continued to identify the patient's lack of moral restraint and willpower as central to the malady.

The first full-length study of the disease, Nymphomania, or a Dissertation Concerning the Furor Uterinus, written by an obscure French doctor, M. Bienville, and translated into English inemphasized that particular connection.

Eating rich food, consuming too much chocolate, dwelling on impure thoughts, reading novels, or performing "secret pollutions" masturbatingaccording to Bienville, overstimulated women's delicate nerve fibers and led to nymphomania. Bienville's successors continued to repeat these same concerns, and exhortations to virtuous behavior intensified throughout the nineteenth century. Without any medical breakthrough or discovery concerning "excessive" or "ungovernable" sexuality, and with very few cures for nervous and mental diseases in general, the physician's best weapon remained a combination of common sense and moral proclamations, administered along with traditional remedies.

In the last quarter of the century, as we will see, some gynecologists thought they had finally found the answer to curing nervous and mental disorders by surgically removing female reproductive organs. The development of medical specialties such as gynecology, neurology, and psychiatry over the course of the nineteenth century led to turf wars in which each specialty promoted its own physiological explanation and treatment for women's diseases.

Yet nymphomania remained elusive, despite nympho girl to classify its symptoms and to categorize its causes on sound scientific principles. Some medical specialists, such as neurologists and alienists the earlier name for psychiatristslooked for a physiological cause of nymphomania in cerebral lesions, changes in the brain's blood vessels, thickening of the cranial bones, or overexcited nympho girl fibers.

They generally took issue with the "uterine theory," which argued that diseased genitals caused the malady. By doing so, they hoped to be able to diagnose, treat, and perhaps cure nymphomania, staking out their particular medical specialty's claim to expertise. Neurologists looked to the relationship between the brain and the nervous system to explain cases of oversexed men and women. Through postmortem examinations nympho girl spinal fluid, for example, they hoped to find some evidence that might help them sustain their claim to treat these disorders.

But autopsies that showed no ificant alteration in the brains of those defined as nymphomaniacs critically challenged the nerve doctors' theories. Neurological research found little organic evidence linking nymphomania to the brain. Even so, for lack of alternatives, neurologists continued to recommend treating the disease with cold compresses, long periods of enforced inactivity, and other remedies directed at the brain and the nervous system.

Alienists, while identifying suppressed or disordered menstruation and similar symptoms as connected to female nervous and mental illness, also looked to the brain and the nervous system as nympho girl location of the disorder. As superintendents of newly opened mental asylums, they espoused the then modern idea that mental illness was curable. The most progressive advocated that it be dealt with by "moral treatment": maniacs and others diagnosed insane were no longer to be restrained in basements and attics, but placed in institutions and treated with a pleasant environment, simple work, and a "regular mode of living.

During the early part of the century, phrenology—at the time thought to be a serious science—took another approach to the question of sexual excess. Phrenologists believed that mental faculties could be determined by measuring the shape of the skull: an enlarged cerebellum the part of the brain located at the back of the head, which controls muscle coordination and bodily equilibrium indicated inordinate sexual appetite. But a particularly sensational case, mentioned in the s in both the American Journal of Psychological Medicine and Mental Pathology and the British medical journal, Lancet —whose tantalizingly few details were cited throughout the nineteenth century—dramatically refuted this claim: an autopsy report on a twelve-year-old girl diagnosed as a nymphomaniac declared that she had no cerebellum.

No further details were given, and we do not know why she was diagnosed with nymphomania, but without a cerebellum the girl would presumably not have been able to walk. If some nineteenth-century doctors located women's diseases in as-yet-undiscovered lesions in the brain or in too highly strung nervous systems, gynecologists emphasized the central nympho girl played by the reproductive organs, not only in diseases of the body but in those of the mind as well. Gynecology, not yet a respected medical specialty in the first half of the nineteenth century, had to fight to establish its professional status and to counter the unseemliness of male doctors examining female genitalia.

Social mores combined with female modesty to limit what a doctor could see or touch. In the early part of the century the physician generally viewed the patient fully clothed, asked probing questions, looked at her face, hands, and feet, then made a diagnosis without ever physically examining her genitals.

By midcentury, gynecologists very tentatively began to use the speculum forerunner to today's instrument, which is inserted into the vagina and to undertake more elaborate physical examinations, although moralists of all stripes protested this invasion of women's bodies. One critic even feared that the use of the speculum itself might so excite a woman's passions that it could cause nymphomania.

Medicine was not a monolith in the nineteenth century and doctors did not speak with one voice about women's diseases.

Nympho girl

Nympho girl addition, patients and their families had treatment alternatives from which to choose: homeopathy, hypnosis, hydrotherapy water cureand folk remedies. Various medical specialties developed competing theories, definitions, and treatments, especially for uncertain diagnoses such as nymphomania. As we will see, women patients also influenced the concept of nymphomania by the way they described their symptoms to the physician.

In the following case, discussed by Dr. Homer Bostwick, author of A Treatise on the Nature and Treatment of Seminal Diseases, Impotency and Other Kindred Affectionsin its eighth edition inwe meet such a woman, who presents herself as so inflamed by passion she fears she might go crazy. Bostwick out of desperation.

Nympho girl

She explained, "If I can't be relieved of this agonizing condition, I am certain that the struggle between my moral sense and lascivious longings must soon send me to the grave. As a result, she understood that stimulating the imagination in these ways was very dangerous.

Her passions were so strong, she told Dr. Bostwick, that "it was with the greatest difficulty that I could conduct myself in a decorous and ladylike manner in the presence of the other sex. Since her husband's death, "my passion has been more inflamed than ever, and I fear that, unless something can be done to relieve me, I shall go crazy. This case, presented in Mrs. It nympho girl all the elements that shaped the eighteenth-century understanding of the disease: inflamed imagination, uncontrollable desire, novel reading, moral struggle, and an inevitable downward slide into madness.

It is unlikely that Mrs. Bostwick used a speculum to examine the "irritated" and "inflamed" genitals, including an elongated clitoris. He treated Mrs. After several weeks, Dr. Bostwick declared that he had completely cured this "highly respectable" Boston widow. She even married again. Here, as in several other cases Dr. Bostwick described, defining nymphomania was not simply the physician's prerogative. Patients shared similar ideas about the body and the passions.

They, too, were highly suspicious and fearful of "unnatural" feelings and interpreted them to mean sexual disease. Nineteenth-century professional journals, medical textbooks, and encyclopedias often declared that satyriasis was the equivalent of nymphomania. Yet, in keeping with their belief that women were less highly sexed than men, many doctors took for granted that the male disease occurred far less frequently. Medical men also assumed that nymphomania, as a disease, was much more severe than satyriasis.

The consequences predicted for the nymphomaniac were generally worse than those for the satyriasist; a nymphomaniac's fate was prostitution or the insane asylum, while at least some physicians thought that a satyriasist might go through life without getting into trouble if he learned to control himself.

Further, many doctors recognized—although they publicly criticized the fact—that it was easier for men to fulfill their sexual desires in "illicit indulgences. The case studies of satyriasis, both in mental institutions and in private treatment, vary enormously.

Like nymphomania, cases of satyriasis included men who openly masturbated, exhibited their genitals, and sexually attacked women, children, and nympho girl institution attendants.

Nympho girl

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Nympho: A Woman's Urge